Oral tradition

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Prof Velcheru Narayan Rao
I will begin with something more evident than communal morality—with Krishnadevaraya’s Empire, as the empire was about to disintegrate. He had these warlords—nayakas, all over South India. In fact, the reason why Krishnadevaraya favoured Telugu is not because he loved Telugu as his own language,…
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Prof. Velcheru Narayan Rao
TranscriptWhy do I call these the ecological bases of Indian literature? I find this rather unconventional that Indian history and everything we know about India is dominated by what I call ‘landed’ culture. Today we think it is the only culture of India, because, since colonialism, ‘landed’…
in Video
Prof. Velcheru Narayan Rao
This is the fourth of the six lectures delivered by prof. Velcheru Narayana Rao as part of the Nauras lecture series held at Bangalore International Centre, Bengaluru, May 2019.  Transcript We have been translating for a long time. As someone who has translated almost fifteen books from Telugu…
in Video
Prof. Velcheru Narayana Rao
This is the first of the six lectures delivered by Prof. Velcheru Narayana Rao as part of the Nauras lecture series held at Bangalore International Centre, Bengaluru, May, 2019. TranscriptI never really wanted anything to be recorded. Orality in my world is temporary. It should die immediately…
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Vikalp Ashiqehind and Rohan Chauhan
  Creative human expression using language is a socio-cultural universal. Literature as a term is usually reserved for individual written creations with a social stamp of artistic merit and an identifiable author. An expanded definition includes both individual and collective creations, which are…
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Mousumi Mandal
Introduction   Bonbibi-r Palagaan is a dramatic performance tradition connected with the worship of the cult goddess Bonbibi. In contrast to the Bengali literary canon, this popular performance-ritual, which is exclusively practised in the Sundarbans in lower delta region West Bengal (India) and…
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Judhajit Sarkar
‘Gaa’ implies ‘gaan’ (song) and ‘jon’ might have come from ‘mahajan’ (the great/noble one). If one goes by this logic, which appears valid in the local, originary context of the word, the meaning of Gajon becomes ‘song dedicated to Shiva (mahajan)’.  
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