Indian Architecture

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7
Narayani Gupta
Chandigarh is known as Le Corbusier’s city, but unknown to many, there was a Polish architect who could have been the City Beautiful’s architect. As part of the series ‘Reading a City’, Sahapedia focuses on Matthew Nowicki’s story and his vision of a Chandigarh that could have been. (In pic:…
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Narayani Gupta
The Indian Muslim architect rejoiced in being ‘free’. He drew inspiration from a range of sources. As part of the series ‘Reading a City’, Sahapedia focuses on historian M. Mujeeb’s references to Indian Muslim architecture. (In pic: Chini ka Rauza in Agra; Photo courtesy: PersianDutchNetwork/…
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Narayani Gupta
Mirza Ismail was disapproving of the British’s improvement of Indian cities and towns, and greatly advocated for the need for gardens and parks. As part of the series ‘Reading a City’, Sahapedia explores Ismail’s thoughts on town-planning and his conflicts with bureaucracy. (Photo Courtesy:…
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Paromita Shastri
The Jhulta Minars, or Shaking Minarets, in Ahmedabad are one of only two of the kind in the world. Having baffled architects, design engineers and tourists alike, we attempt to find out more about these unusual minarets that once belonged to the Sidi Bashir mosque. (Photo courtesy: The British…
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Narayani Gupta
Just in his 20s, architect and artist Gordon Sanderson assumed charge of conserving and landscaping many clusters of historic monuments. As part of the series ‘Reading a City’, Sahapedia focuses on the young archaeologist’s engagement with Delhi’s architecture, and his fascination for the craftsman…
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B.N. Goswamy
There is much in our way of seeing and rendering mirrors that is full of great fascination. Prof. B.N. Goswamy writes about the mirror as something that both reveals and conceals at the same time, and the Persian legend of Alexander’s ironsmith having invented the mirror. (In pic: Darpana, one of…
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Narayani Gupta
The past is in many ways a foreign country, and to walk through towns of the past slowly is an invigorating exercise. And there are those who can read them, see how they had grown. Some, such as Syed Ahmed Khan and Patrick Geddes, can use words vividly to conjure up other people in another time…
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