Colonial India

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Srimati Ghosal
He took an early retirement to focus on his interest in popular art, cartooning and poster making, and turned to the neglected art of Bengali political cartoons. He won two consecutive grants (in 2007 and 2010) under the ‘Bengali Language Initiative’ of the Indian Foundation for the Arts to archive…
in Interview
Srimati Ghosal
As Shakespeare never exhausts his supply of 'horn' jokes for mocking cuckoldry, the satirist of contemporary fashions relies without fail on the mistaken sexual identity.  —Susan C. Saphiro[1] Perhaps the most hackneyed subject of ridicule in a satire of any form, from any part of the world, is…
in Article
Srimati Ghosal
Political caricature was introduced to the Indian subcontinent by the British colonisers in the second half of the nineteenth century. The railways, the telegraph and the printing press that were introduced by the British to help the imperial project in India went on to become critical apparatus in…
in Overview
Srimati Ghosal
The art of political caricature was brought into the Indian subcontinent by the British colonisers. A British cartoon periodical, Punch, was widely circulated throughout the empire, and reached India and Bengal, even though it regularly derided the colonial subject. This happened in the second half…
in Module
Sumit Chaturvedi
Dimpy Mishra also runs the Ranglok Academy for Professional Arts in the city. After finishing his early education from Agra, Mishra completed his postgraduation in theatre arts from Bhartendu Natya Academy in Lucknow. He has also appeared in a feature film, Bhoomi, directed by Omung Kumar. In 2018…
in Interview
Sumit Chaturvedi
In the history of Indian vernacular theatre, Hindi language theatre is relatively new. It only evolved with the evolution of modern Hindi prose in the late nineteenth century. This was the period of the ongoing struggle for Indian Independence which was accompanied by a call for social and cultural…
in Overview
Sumit Chaturvedi
The Hindi theatre tradition evolved later than many other linguistic theatre traditions of India. It came up within the specific sociopolitical context of India’s Independence movement and as a response to the call given for social and cultural renaissance in the Hindi-speaking belt during the late…
in Module