Visual Arts

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Ajanta Das
Arunachal Pradesh, the easternmost Indian state, displays a rich and diverse Buddhist culture; both Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism are practised here. While the Tibetan form of Mahayanist art and culture present in western Arunachal Pradesh has been documented, the Theravada heritage remains…
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Ajanta Das
Buddhism is a living religious culture in Arunachal Pradesh. As a religion and a philosophy, Buddhism traces back to Siddhartha Gautama who lived in the ancient Indian city of Magadha in the sixth century BCE and attained enlightenment to be known as the Buddha. Over time, Buddhism became a…
in Overview
Ajanta Das
Arunachal Pradesh, situated in the northeastern periphery of India, is a prominent Buddhist state. Buddhism reached Arunachal from Tibet and Southeast Asia in the early and late medieval period and continues to be a living religious culture with numerous Buddhist communities scattered across the…
in Module
Sainico Ningthoujam
She received the National Award for embroidery in 2004. Today, she is an entrepreneur promoting the art of handmade embroidery and preserving traditional motifs in phanek mayek naibi (a patterned sarong worn by Meitei women).  Following is an edited transcript of the interview conducted at Devi’s…
in Interview
Sainico Ningthoujam
Phanek is a sarong worn by the Meitei people of Manipur as part of their traditional attire. It has distinct weaving patterns and motifs depending on the community wearing it, its history, regional specificity and traditions.  Lower garments like phanek are found across India’s Northeast, such as …
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Sainico Ningthoujam
The sarong is a popular traditional lower garment in East Asian communities and has several distinctions based on the individual history or practices of distinct tribes. In the northeastern region of India alone, the ethnic diversity of people living along the Eastern Himalaya have stylistic…
in Overview
Sainico Ningthoujam
Phanek mayek naibi is the traditional sarong worn by Meitei women in Manipur. It continues to be an intrinsic part of their formal wear as well as a part of traditional and festive attire.   The motifs that are used to decorate the borders of the phanek can be traced back to indigenous mythologies …
in Module
Sharmistha Chaudhuri
Patuas, the itinerant performers of the folk art of patachitra, went from village to village with illustrated pats (scrolls) made of handmade paper; their performance involved reading out their hand-drawn religious narratives interspersed with songs to a patient rural audience.[1] The first mention…
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