Urban history

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Raziuddin Aquil
Introduction This article aims to explore the connections between the emergence of Delhi as a major Sufi centre and sanctuary of Islam and its becoming the seat of political power.[1] If Ajmer was the Mecca of Islam in Hindustan, Delhi emerged in the 13th and 14th centuries as its Medina. Three out…
in Article
Matias Echanove and Rahul Srivastava
  The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw a settling down of the urban industrial haze that had enveloped economic and political centres all over the world. During those unsettling decades, cities were still shaping themselves vis-à-vis emerging industrial modern realities – primarily, increased…
in Article
Aditi Dey
The chawls of Mumbai have been the most recognisable characteristic of the urban identity of the city. Initially built by the colonial state for the working classes who migrated into the city to work at the illustrious textile mills, chawls gradually transformed into the most common middle-class…
in Module
  Prof. Malekandathil describes what Sufi spaces meant to the people of 14th-century Delhi, many of whom were migrants from Baghdad or had come from rural areas seeking work in the army and workshops of the Sultanate. Sufism provided them direction, a way of making sense of their lives in an…
in Interview
Amita Kanekar
  Located on the south bank of the river Mandovi, upstream from the capital Panjim, Old Goa is today a site of tourist consumption for the best part of the year. From a sea of palms rise a few majestic buildings, set on the lawns that typically denote a site protected by the Archaeological Survey…
in Overview