Saha Sutra

Displaying 11 - 20 of 232
Chandramolle Modgil
A close look at the Rajput warrior’s celebrated weapons, now preserved in museums and forts of the Rajputana states. Sahapedia’s eclectic selection aims to give an interesting insight into not only the various influences on weapon development but also into the world of ceremonial versus functional…
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Laura Marsolek
The impressive painting of nineteenth-century Jodhpur Maharaja Takhat Singh is prominently displayed at the Umaid Bhawan Palace. While many might have seen reproductions of the painting, not many know how the portrait marks a significant change in the art of portraiture among the Rajputana royalty…
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Abhilasha Ojha
Satish Gujral, one of India’s foremost modernist painters, experimented with his creativity, in his art, through a diverse range of media. From painting on the theme of Partition, loss and violence to moving to muralism, Gujral’s oeuvre is expansive and varied. We revisit his rich artistic legacy…
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Nishita Banerjee
For 40 days in the year, an entire village in Rajasthan’s Mewar region loses itself in the celebrations of the mother goddess, Gavari. We train the spotlight in this unique festival in which all members of the local Bhil tribe come together to perform a mystical dance and music drama like none…
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Amiya P. Sen
Over a hundred years back, intellectuals in India were debating the same issues we are now—what comprises ‘Hindu food’? Does it include meat or not? And does the controlled suppression of one’s natural instincts through abstinence lead to spiritual progress? We explore this controversial subject…
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Anita Rampal
As a Covid-19-strapped world has the spotlight trained on scientists and scientific discovery like never before, and discussions on ‘scientific social responsibility’ take centre stage in India, Prof Anita Rampal finds that a rereading of Jawaharlal Nehru’s ‘Discovery of India’ (1946), where he…
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Harminder K.
The founder of Sikhism, Guru Nanak’s life has been recorded in Janamsakhis, while his travels on foot—across nine countries over 21 years—are known as Udasis. We take a peek into these records of how a young storekeeper emerged from a river as a Guru, and went on to change the world forever. We…
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Shreya Gupta
Rightly called ‘Voice of the Times’, Akbar Allahabadi was one of Urdu language’s premiere political satirist in Hindustan. His words spared neither the British nor Indians who supported the Raj. He pre-empted the existence of Hinglish as a colloquial language, and injected his poetry with just the…
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Amiya P. Sen
Bengalis are known to quote Shakespeare as much as they do Tagore or Marx. But when did the words and ideas of the bard take hold of the Bengali intelligentsia? We explore three ways in which Shakespeare’s dramas made an indelible impact on the Bengali mind, starting in nineteenth-century Bengal. (…
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Tiggy Allen
Of one of the strangest places for a craft to be revived, the Jaipur Central jail played a key part in the revival and protection of the art of hand-woven carpets. A Mughal import into India, colonial influence over the Indian subcontinent by the 1850s had shrunk traditional crafts like carpet…
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